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Executive At-Home Male Hormones Test

Executive At-Home Male Hormones Test

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The Lab Me executive at-home male hormones test helps assess baseline levels before hormone replacement therapy, or for estrogen dominance, hypogonadism, andropause, fatigue, low libido, erectile dysfunction, infertility, and adrenal dysfunction. Also ideal for monitoring HRT dosing.

Includes, a full assessment of thyroid health, including screening for hypo or hyperthyroidism, testing for autoimmune thyroid disease, and monitoring thyroid replacement dosage.

Includes licensed physician reviewed results and recommendations on improvement.  You are also allowed to ask our medical team any questions you may have regarding your results for no additional charge.

What tests are included?
  • Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA),
  • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH),
  • Free Triiodothyronine (fT3),
  • Free Thyroxin (fT4),
  • Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOab),
  • Estradiol ,
  • Progesterone,
  • Testosterone,
  • DHEA Sulfate,
  • Cortisol x 4 (Four measurements,
Collection Method
$279.00
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If purchasing for two people, it’s required to create their account to order.

All Lab Me tests are performed by high-complexity CLIA certified and CAP-accredited laboratories.

 

Premium At-Home Blood Tests From Lab Me

All Premium Test Kits From Lab Me Come In A HIPPA Secure PDF Format With Functional Medicine Physician Reviewed Recommendations. You Are Able To Ask Our Medical Team As Many Questions As You Want Regarding Your Results.

Who Should Consider Taking This Executive At-Home Male Hormones Test ?

  • Low Libido
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Loss of Muscle Mass & Strength
  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Sleep Disturbances
  • Negative Changes In Cardiovascular Profiles
Symptoms and Reasons to Test
Normal Ranges
Why track?
Should I take the test?
Additional Info

Symptoms and Reasons to Test

The Crucial At-Home Male Hormones Test Is Encouraged If You Are Experiencing:

As men age, their levels of testosterone begin to decline, usually beginning
around the mid-40s. This heralds what is commonly known as andropause,
the male counterpart to menopause. While this is a natural part of aging, the decline in testosterone production by the testes can be more precipitous in some men than others.

Using Lab Me's at-home male hormones test gives you insight into such issues.

Excessive weight gain, stress, lack of exercise, and many medications further contribute to a man’s ability to manufacture testosterone, resulting in even lower testosterone levels and leading to symptoms of andropause.

These symptoms may include low libido, irritability, depression, loss of muscle mass and strength, weight gain, metabolic syndrome, erectile dysfunction, sleep disturbances, osteoporosis, and adverse changes in the blood lipid profile.

However, while hormone replacement therapy is certainly an option, the solution to the problem may not be a simple case of restoring testosterone levels. For example, some practitioners find that testosterone therapy may be of little benefit unless problems affecting cortisol production are addressed first.

The body’s response to stress is mediated by increased cortisol production, and this prepares the body for “fight or flight” by shutting down other processes, including testosterone production.

Correcting disorders such as adrenal fatigue or chronic stress may therefore lead to improved testosterone levels and resolve symptoms, without requiring testosterone therapy.

Increasing cortisol levels, along with several other endocrine changes, have been reported in men, highlighting the need to obtain a complete hormone profile such as this test, before initiating any hormone replacement.

Normal Ranges

Executive At-Home Male Hormone Test Ranges (Saliva)

Testosterone (ng/dl)

Age Dependant: 44 - 148
5-10 mg topical 12-24 hr: 115-3700

DHEA-Sulfate (ng/dL)

Age Dependent 2-23

Estradiol (pg/ml)

0.5-2.2

Progesterone (ng/ml)

12-100
Topical Progesterone (5-10 mg): 100-500

Cortisol (ng/ml)

Morning: 3.7-9.5
Noon: 1.2-3.0
Evening: 0.6-1.9
night: 0.4-1.0

Executive At-Home Male Hormone Test Ranges (Blood)

Free Thyroxine (fT4) ng/dL  0.7-2.5

Free Triiodothyronine (fT3) pg/mL 2.4-4.2 

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) μU/mL 0.5-3.0 

Thyroid Peroxidase (TPO) Antibodies IU/mL <70

Why Track?

Should I Take The Test?

Additional Info

Estradiol (E2)

Estradiol is an estrogen and the primary sex hormone for females. It is important in regulating the reproductive cycles for females. It is released from ovaries and adrenal glands and plays a major role in the growth of women's reproductive tissues, including breasts, uterus, fallopian tubes, and vagina throughout life stages. This also affects other tissues including bone, fat, skin, liver, and brain. When assessing menopausal symptoms that may include hot flashes, mood disturbances, and aging skin, it is important to compare the relationship between estradiol and progesterone. 

Males do have estradiol in their bodies but the amount compared to females is much lower. Estradiol is released from the testes and adrenal glands. Since males lack female anatomy, they must generate estrogen through a process involving aromatase, an enzyme that converts testosterone into estradiol. Estradiol has been shown in vitro to stop cell destruction, but its clinical importance in male sexual function and growth is lower than in females.

Progesterone (Pg)

Progesterone is a female hormone, released during ovulation by the ovaries. When a sperm fertilizes an egg, progesterone helps to prepare the uterus lining (endometrium) for the egg. If the egg is not fertilized, the level of progesterone decreases, and menstrual bleeding starts. During pregnancy the placenta releases high levels of progesterone, beginning at the end of the first trimester and continuing through birth. Pregnant women have progesterone levels almost 10 times higher than females who are not pregnant. Additionally, certain forms of cancer trigger elevated levels of progesterone in both men and women.

Testosterone

Testosterone is the primary sex hormone and anabolic steroid for males. Testosterone plays a key role in male reproductive tissue production, such as testes and prostate, as well as promoting secondary sexual characteristics, such as increased muscle and bone mass, and body hair growth. Female ovaries do produce testosterone in much smaller amounts compared to males. Testosterone development begins to increase dramatically during puberty and starts declining after age 30 or so.

DHEA Sulfate

DHEA sulfate is an androgen (male sex hormone) that is present in the blood of both men and women. It assists in the development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty and can be metabolized into testosterone and androstenedione (more potent androgens), or changed into estrogen (a female hormone). The outer layer of the adrenal glands, the adrenal cortex, is responsible for producing DHEA sulfate, while smaller amounts are produced in the testes and ovaries. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate secretion is controlled by the pituitary hormone adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and other pituitary factors. Since DHEA,s is primarily produced by the adrenal glands, it is a strong marker for adrenal function. Cancers, adrenal tumors, and hyperplasia can lead to the overproduction of DHEA sulfate. While elevated levels may not be noticed in adult men, they can lead to visible symptoms of virilization and amenorrhea.

Cortisol

Cortisol, the major adrenal glucocorticoid steroid hormone, is usually under feedback control by pituitary ACTH and the hypothalamus. Causes of low cortisol include pituitary failure or destruction, with resultant loss of ACTH to stimulate the adrenal, and metabolic errors or destruction of the adrenal gland itself (adrenogenital syndromes, tuberculosis, histoplasmosis). The diagnosis of hypoadrenalism usually requires confirmation with ACTH stimulation, due to the circadian rhythms of cortisol and other factors. Causes of increased cortisol, which may initially present as simply a loss of normal diurnal variation, include pituitary overproduction of ACTH, production of ACTH by a tumor (notably oat cell cancers), and adrenal adenomas.

TSH – Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

Produced by the pituitary, TSH acts on the thyroid gland to stimulate the production of the thyroid hormones T4 and T3. Higher than normal TSH can indicate a disorder of the thyroid gland, while low TSH can indicate over-production of, or excessive supplementation with, T4 and/or T3, which acts in negative feedback on the pituitary to reduce TSH production. Low TSH can also be caused by problems in the pituitary gland itself, which results in insufficient TSH being produced to stimulate the thyroid (secondary hypothyroidism).

Free T4 – Thyroxine
T4 (thyroxine)

fT4 is the predominant hormone produced by the thyroid gland. It is an inactive hormone and is converted to its active form, T3 within cells. Free T4 is the non-bound fraction of the total T4 circulating in the blood. Free T4 is available to the issues and represents 0.04% of the total T4 levels. High TSH combined with low free T4 levels indicates hypothyroidism while low TSH and high free T4 levels indicate hyperthyroidism.

Free T3 – Triiodothyronine

The active thyroid hormone that regulates the metabolic activity of cells. Free T3 is the non-protein-bound fraction circulating in the blood, representing about 0.4% of the total circulating T3, which is available to tissues. Elevated T3 levels are seen in hyperthyroid patients, but levels can be normal in hypothyroid patients because it does not represent the intracellular conversion of T4 to T3, which comprises about 60% of all T3 formed in tissues.

TPOab – Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies

Thyroid peroxidase is an enzyme used by the thyroid gland in the manufacture of thyroid hormones by liberating iodine for attachment to tyrosine residues on thyroglobulin. In patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (predominantly Hashimoto’s disease), the body produces antibodies that attack the thyroid gland, and levels of these antibodies in the blood can diagnose this condition and indicate the extent of the disease.

Preparation: 10-12 hours fasting is required. Avoid anti-aging/anti-wrinkle facial creams for 3 days prior to testing as they may contain undisclosed hormones.

Test Results: 7-8 Days once the lab receives the specimen. May take longer based on weather, holiday or lab delays.

How to collect your sample

Lab Me’s at home test kits include everything you need for collection and can be ordered online. When your sample has been collected and allowed to dry completely, return the dried strips and completed paperwork in the pre-addressed, pre-paid packaging and mailer bag provided with the kit. Once Lab Me has received your sample, results will be returned to you and/or your health care provider in approximately 5 to 7 business days.
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This Is How

Lab Me Works

1

Get Your Lab Me Kit

Order online and choose how often you’d like a test. We’ll mail your kit and it’ll be in your hands within only a few days.

2

Perform Your Test

Your kit contains everything you need to test from home. When you’re done, use the pre-paid envelope to send it back

3

Rapid, Accurate Results

Once we receive the test and process it, the results will be on your dashboard within 48 hours.

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